suicideblonde:

Helena Bonham Carter photographed by Kate Berry

suicideblonde:

Helena Bonham Carter photographed by Kate Berry


He wanted all to lie in an ecstasy of peace; I wanted all to sparkle and dance in a glorious jubilee. I said his heaven would be only half alive; and he said mine would be drunk: I said I should fall asleep in his; and he said he could not breathe in mine.
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

(via larmoyante)


Wine comes in at the mouth
And love comes in at the eye;
That’s all we shall know for truth
Before we grow old and die.
I lift the glass to my mouth,
I look at you, and I sigh.
W.B. Yeats, “A Drinking Song” (via larmoyante)

I never wish to be easily defined. I’d rather float over other people’s minds as something strictly fluid and non-perceivable; more like a transparent, paradoxically iridescent creature rather than an actual person.
Franz Kafka, from a diary entry dated 23 March 1914 (via larmoyante)

It’s a most distressing affliction to have a sentimental heart and a skeptical mind.
Naguib Mahfouz (via larmoyante)

I don’t want to repeat my innocence. I want the pleasure of losing it again.
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise (via larmoyante)

(via lexparsimonae)


newyorker:


Fifty years ago today, on October 16, 1962, President John Kennedy was shown aerial photographs of offensive Soviet nuclear weapons in Cuba. Thus began the Cuban missile crisis and history’s highest-stakes game of chicken.
During the following thirteen days, my grandfather, Paul Nitze, then a high-ranking official in the Defense Department, was a member of ExComm, a small group of men who debated how the United States should respond. The President secretly recorded many of the conversations, but Nitze was the only participant authorized to take notes.

A few years ago, while researching a book about Nitze and his long-time friend and rival George Kennan—“The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan and the History of the Cold War”—I came upon these notes, sitting in a box, behind a boiler, in a building at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, a school which Nitze had helped to found and where he worked when not in government. I quoted from them in the book, and donated them to the Library of Congress as part of a large collection that is now available for viewing. In honor of the anniversary, I’m also putting them all online today. Nitze’s handwriting isn’t great, and my digital photography isn’t either. But they provide a real-time glimpse at decisions made during a moment of terror.



Click-through for more from Nicholas Thompson on JFK and ExComm’s meetings about the Cuban missile crisis, and to see Nitze’s exclusive notes.
Photograph by Cecil Stoughton/White House.

newyorker:

Fifty years ago today, on October 16, 1962, President John Kennedy was shown aerial photographs of offensive Soviet nuclear weapons in Cuba. Thus began the Cuban missile crisis and history’s highest-stakes game of chicken.

During the following thirteen days, my grandfather, Paul Nitze, then a high-ranking official in the Defense Department, was a member of ExComm, a small group of men who debated how the United States should respond. The President secretly recorded many of the conversations, but Nitze was the only participant authorized to take notes.

A few years ago, while researching a book about Nitze and his long-time friend and rival George Kennan—“The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan and the History of the Cold War”—I came upon these notes, sitting in a box, behind a boiler, in a building at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, a school which Nitze had helped to found and where he worked when not in government. I quoted from them in the book, and donated them to the Library of Congress as part of a large collection that is now available for viewing. In honor of the anniversary, I’m also putting them all online today. Nitze’s handwriting isn’t great, and my digital photography isn’t either. But they provide a real-time glimpse at decisions made during a moment of terror.

Click-through for more from Nicholas Thompson on JFK and ExComm’s meetings about the Cuban missile crisis, and to see Nitze’s exclusive notes.

Photograph by Cecil Stoughton/White House.


ANNA KARENINA TRAILER!

(via popculturebrain)


I know that I am alive
between two parentheses.
Octavio Paz, from “Certainty”, in The Collected Poems of Octavio Paz: 1957-1987, edited by Eliot Weinberger (via apoetreflects)

(via the-final-sentence)